Brewing Heritage Trail
Brewing Heritage Trail
A chilly hello on the Brewsday before Thanksgiving! Looking for something to do during the cold months ahead? Join the Brewing Heritage Trail on our new indoor seasonal tour called the Cincinnati Brewing & Distilling Tasting Tour to learn about modern and historic brewing and distilling. That’s not all, we’ll get to sample beverages and visit a 19th century underground lagering cellar along the way! No other tour in the city offers historic and modern brewing and distilling, with an underground cellar exploration, so don’t miss out on this unique seasonal tour offered only by the Brewing Heritage Trail!

Tours are offered on Saturday afternoons starting in December and for more information check out our website at: https://brewingheritagetrail.org
Brewing Heritage Trail
Brewing Heritage Trail
Happy Brewsday! Looking for something interesting to do with friends and family in town for the holidays? Well, you're in luck, the Brewing Heritage Trail is offering public tours on the days before and after Thanksgiving! All tours visit an underground lagering cellar from the 1850s and include a beer at local taproom. We offer several different experiences, so check out our website: https://brewingheritagetrail.org for all the details!
Brewing Heritage Trail
Brewing Heritage Trail
Happy Brewsday to you all! Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood has the largest collection of pre-Prohibition brewing structures in the country, but not all of those still in existence are above ground! Pictured here is the Walker Brewery, one of the city's earliest breweries, getting started in 1825. Its proprietor, John Walker, preferred to produce English and Scottish Ales for most of the time he was in charge of the facility. He resisted the production of lagers until his untimely death in 1853, when he was tragically run over by one of his own beer wagons outside of the brewery. His widow Marian took over operations for several years, along with their nephews, expanding production into the field of lagers, which included underground cellars.

Today, the above ground brewing structures are all gone and a modern parking garage sits on much of the site along Sycamore Street. However, the lagering cellars underneath remain! The pictures included in this post show the brewery as it was in 1885, a Sanborn insurance map detailing the layout in 1891, the modern parking garage, and an access passage inside the parking garage leading down into the Walker cellars! If you'd like to learn more, the Brewing Heritage Trail includes this stop on our Cellars, Saloons & Streetcars Tour, which runs on Saturdays at 11am! For more information, go to our website at: https://brewingheritagetrail.org
Brewing Heritage Trail
Brewing Heritage Trail
Join us on Wednesday, November 9 at 5:30pm for the monthly Brewery District Meeting at the Brewing Heritage Trail Tour Center, located at 1939 Race Street. Come to socialize, have a beer, and share information about things going on in the neighborhood! Interested in what is happening with the historic Sohn/Clyffside Brewery and the Jackson Brewery? How about Cin-Bev, who produce Hudepohl & Schoenling brand beers? Well you're in luck! The project supervisor and new Brewery District Board Member, Elliot Culter, will be in attendance to give us an update and answer questions. Don't miss out on this great opportunity learn more about the project and their future plans!
Brewing Heritage Trail
Brewing Heritage Trail
Greeting on another fantastic Brewsday! Pictured here is a brewery of several names. Originally known as the St. Louis Brewery in 1852, it saw limited success until the Schmidt brothers began running it in 1875. The brothers grew the business over many years and even though it was never a top level producer of beer in the city in terms of quantity, they had a loyal group of customers that kept them in business for more than 30 years. Eventually the brewery was sold to a group of investors in 1905, who changed the name to the Crown Brewing Company. This was the name of the Schmidt's flagship brand of beer and they hoped to capitalize on its longstanding relationship with the city.

Under the Schmidt brothers, the brewery expanded across the street and in order to more effectively move materials between the locations, they dug a tunnel underneath busy McMicken Avenue in 1885. This set up was typical of many breweries in the neighborhood, but most of these locations have long since been filled in or destroyed. Fortunately, this tunnel still exists today and is part of the Brewing Heritage Trail's Brewers & Barons Tour, which runs Saturday mornings at 10am! If you'd like to check it out for yourself, go to: https://brewingheritagetrail.org